Doris Katherine Hotchkin

F, (10 March 1934 - 29 June 1999)
     Doris Katherine Hotchkin was born on 10 March 1934 at Wapakoneta, Auglaize County, OH, USA. She was the daughter of Walter James Hotchkin and Pearl Lula Rosell. She married Gerald Eugene Putland at OH, USA, on 9 June 1955. Doris Katherine Hotchkin and Gerald Eugene Putland were divorced on 14 October 1992 at Miami, Miami Dade County, FL, USA. On 10 sep 1993 Gerald married Leah Alberta Scheufel..1 Doris Katherine Hotchkin died on 29 June 1999 at Miami, Miami Dade County, FL, at age 65. She was buried at Woodland Park Cemetery, at Miami, Miami Dade County, FL, USA.

     Doris' son Kenneth says that she was a Registered Nurse and earned her BS NR at Ohio State University.
Last Edited=28 Mar 2017

Citations

  1. [S622] Florida Divorce Index 1927- 2001.

Doris Louise Hotchkin

F
     Doris Louise Hotchkin is the daughter of Leon Stanley Hotchkin and Lenora May Bush. She married William A. Saunders at Niagara County, NY, USA, in 1954.1
Last Edited=1 Feb 2008

Children of Doris Louise Hotchkin and William A. Saunders

Citations

  1. [S108] Nancy Rae Valenti, Compiler Edgar E Hotchkin.

Doris Mae Hotchkin

F, (23 April 1923 - 10 March 2004)
     Doris Mae Hotchkin was born on 23 April 1923 at Washington, Warren County, NJ, USA.1 She was the daughter of Harold Donald Hotchkin Sr. and Charlotte Marguerite (Lottie) Leek. She married Rolland Earl Young at Washington, Warren County, NJ, on 4 July 1943. Married at the Methodist Church in Washington, Warren County, NJ.. Doris Mae Hotchkin died on 10 March 2004 at Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ, USA, at age 80.1,2 She was buried at Musconetong Valley Cemetery, at Hampton, Hunterdon County, NJ, USA.

     Doris supplied a lot of the information in the Brown book. Her address as of 1990 was in Washington, NJ.3
Last Edited=26 Dec 2015

Children of Doris Mae Hotchkin and Rolland Earl Young

Citations

  1. [S163] , Confirms the year.
  2. [S218] Social Security Death Index 1935- 2014.
  3. [S10] Geoffrey Brown, John Hodgkin of Guilford Connecticut.

Dorothy Hotchkin

F, (circa 1911 - before 1920)
     Dorothy Hotchkin was born circa 1911 at Liberty, Sullivan County, NY, USA.1 She was the daughter of Horace Nathan Hotchkin and Mary (May) Ishultz. Dorothy Hotchkin died before 1920 at Liberty, Sullivan County, NY. Not with the family at the 1920 census..

     She was not included in the 1900 Census or the 1920 census.
Last Edited=3 Feb 2008

Citations

  1. [S165] Birth date based on spouses birth date for identification purposes only.

Dorothy Hotchkin1

F, (10 November 1909 - 5 September 2000)
     Dorothy Hotchkin was born on 10 November 1909 at Binghamton, Broome County, NY, USA. She was the daughter of Charles Fenton Hotchkin and Cora Grace Bartoo. Dorothy Hotchkin died on 5 September 2000 at Buffalo, Erie County, NY, USA, at age 90.

     At Charles F. Hotchkin's death his obituary describes Dorothy as a sister. The Compiler believes that she is likely an adopted daughter.
Last Edited=22 Aug 2014

Citations

  1. [S105] Ruth Elizabeth Hotchkin Clapper, Compiler Edgar E Hotchkin.

Dorothy Alice Hotchkin

F, (14 March 1913 - 16 January 2003)
     Dorothy Alice Hotchkin was born on 14 March 1913 at Jasper County, IA, USA.1 She was the daughter of James Alfred Hotchkin and Mary Frances Duggan. She married Proctor Odell Stepp at Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL, USA, on 31 October 1932. Dorothy Alice Hotchkin died on 16 January 2003 at Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA, USA, at age 89.1 She was buried at Hazelwood Cemetery, at Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA, USA.
Last Edited=26 May 2017

Child of Dorothy Alice Hotchkin and Proctor Odell Stepp

Citations

  1. [S218] Social Security Death Index 1935- 2014.

Douglas Robert Hotchkin

M
2nd Lt. Douglas Robert Hotchkin
Big Springs, TX March 1970
     Douglas Robert Hotchkin is the son of Albert Leet Hotchkin III and Amelia Leskowicz. Douglas Robert Hotchkin married Angie M. Unknown.
Last Edited=14 Jan 2017

Child of Douglas Robert Hotchkin and Angie M. Unknown

Duane (Dwayne) William Hotchkin1

M, (26 July 1955 - 18 August 2009)
     Duane (Dwayne) William Hotchkin was born on 26 July 1955 at Klamath Falls, Klamath County, OR, USA.2 He was the son of William Russell Hotchkin Jr. and Jean Annette Jamieson. He resided at Anchorage, Anchorage County, AK, USA, in 2005. Duane (Dwayne) William Hotchkin died on 18 August 2009 at Sumner, Pierce County, WA, USA, at age 54. Daily World, The (Aberdeen, WA) - August 22, 2009

Duane W. Hotchkin
Aberdeen resident Duane William Hotchkin died Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2009, at his home. He was 54.Arrangements are by Whiteside Family Mortuary of Aberdeen.2,3
Last Edited=24 Jun 2017

Citations

  1. [S514] Wards Funeral Records.
  2. [S218] Social Security Death Index 1935- 2014.
  3. [S470] Washington State Death Index 1940-1996, died in Grays Harbor, WA.

Dustin Arthur Hotchkin

M
     Dustin Arthur Hotchkin is the son of Wilbur Arthur Hotchkin and Rebecca Sue Jurgenson.
Last Edited=27 Aug 2000

Dustin Wayne Hotchkin

M
     Dustin Wayne Hotchkin is the son of Brent Wayne Hotchkin and Linda Mae Haines.
Last Edited=5 Oct 2007

Earl Anthony Hotchkin

M
     Earl Anthony Hotchkin is the son of Earl Edward Hotchkin and Rita Catherine Cypert. He married Mary Jane Horvath at NY, USA, on 24 August 1968.
Last Edited=20 Jan 2007

Child of Earl Anthony Hotchkin and Mary Jane Horvath

Earl Edward Hotchkin1

M, (11 January 1919 - 25 May 1992)
     Earl Edward Hotchkin was born on 11 January 1919 at Liberty, Sullivan County, NY, USA.2 He was the son of William Mead Hotchkin and Pearl May Grant. He married Rita Catherine Cypert at NY, USA, on 12 April 1942. Earl Edward Hotchkin enlsted on 13 May 1942 while living at Sullivan County, NY, USA. His enlistment notes said: " Earl E. Hotchkin, native of NY, Sullivan County, enlisted at Ft Jay, Governors Island, branch inmaterial, Private, grammer school, height 69, weight 147.". He resided at Parksville, Sullivan County, NY, USA, in 1991. Earl died on 25 May 1992 at Parksville, Sullivan County, NY, at age 73. Death date also given in Rita's obituary..3 He was buried at Hillside Cemetery, at Woodbourne, Sullivan County, NY, USA.

     Geoffrey Brown says that Earl was the source of most of the information on the descendants of Albert Hotchkin and an active historian of that branch of the family. They resided on Aden Rd., Liberty, NY.
Last Edited=8 Jun 2017

Citations

  1. [S266] Edward E. Hotchkin, Compiler Edgar E Hotchkin.
  2. [S218] Social Security Death Index 1935- 2014, SS #063-12-7881.
  3. [S218] Social Security Death Index 1935- 2014.

Earl J. Hotchkin

M, (12 August 1899 - 20 October 1901)
     Earl was born at Neversink, Sullivan County, NY, USA, on 12 August 1899. Birth calculated from age at death 2 yr- 2 mo - 8 days.. He was the son of Frank William Hotchkin and Eunice E. Lewis. Earl died on 20 October 1901 at Liberty, Sullivan County, NY, USA, at age 2.1
Last Edited=27 Jan 2007

Citations

  1. [S59] New York Death Index 1880 to 1956, File # 42861.

Earl Hotchkin Jr.

M, (1929 - 14 October 1929)
     Earl Hotchkin Jr. was born in 1929 at Durant, Bryan County, OK, USA. Likely that he died at birth or very early as there is no birth date on the gravestone. He was the son of Alfred Earl Hotchkin and Thelma Bennett. Earl Hotchkin Jr. died on 14 October 1929 at Durant, Bryan County, OK.1 He was buried at Highland Cemetery, at Durant, Bryan County, OK, USA.

     Earl is buried next to his father and Aunt Christine at Highland Cemetery with a baby marker that says Earl Hotchkin Jr. October 14 1929.
Last Edited=13 Oct 2016

Citations

  1. [S163] , This grave has been view and photographed by Compiler.

Earnest Hotchkin

M, (1872 - )
     Earnest Hotchkin was born in 1872 at Sullivan County, NY, USA. He was the son of Seth Hotchkin and Fanny Twaddell.
Last Edited=5 Apr 2017

Earnest Frank Hotchkin

M, (1 June 1859 - 9 November 1936)
     Earnest Frank Hotchkin was born on 1 June 1859 at El Paso, Woodford County, IL, USA. This birth date is in his mothers Civil War Pension application.1,2 He was the son of Eber Hall Hotchkin Segt. and Celia Ann Bayne. He married Anna (Annie) Mueller at Peoria County, IL, USA, on 20 July 1880. Marriage date according to 1900 census and IL Marriage Index..3 Earnest Frank Hotchkin appeared on the census of 1900 at Chicago, Cook County, IL, USA. The census lists the family as: Hotchkin, F. E., age 40, b 6-1859 in IL, father born IL, mother OH, switchman for railroad; wife Annie, age 38, b 6-1861, born MO, parents born Germany; daughter Della M., Nov 1881, age 19, born IL, dress trimmer; son John F., age 18, b 3-1882 in SD, single, day labor; son William M., age 16, b 4-1884 in SD, single, apprentice blacksmith; son Hugh J., age 13, b 11-1886 in SD, day labor; dau Frances C., age 8, b 10-1891 in IL, at school; dau Hanna M., age 6, b 10-1893 in IL, at school; son Walter J., age 4, b 10-1895 in IL; dau Myrtle M., age 2, b 11-1897 in IL.. He married Matilda Frichow Firhon at Chicago, Cook County, IL, USA, in 1918. Date according to the 1930 census.. Earnest Frank Hotchkin was a Carpenter in 1920. He resided at Chicago, Cook County, IL, in 1928. He died on 9 November 1936 at Chicago, Cook County, IL, at age 77. Listed as Frank E. in Cook County Death records..4,5 He was buried at Mount Glenwood Memory Gardens (West), at Willow Springs, Cook County, IL, USA.

     Frank's grandson Hugh Miller Hotchkin reports on this individual, but much of the information was confused with his father, Eber. Hugh says that Frank had brothers who joined the Union army and one died of starvation in a confederate prison camp. This was his father, Eber. According to Hugh, Frank (Eber) moved down the Allegheny River and Ohio River to North Bend, Ohio, and then, across Indiana to El Paso, IL where they lived for a while. Eber did live and was married in El Paso. From there the family moved across Iowa and ended near Mitchell, South Dakota (Hugh is correct that this would be Frank's family). After hardships with cold winters and dry summers Frank decided to move to Chicago. The move to Chicago was in cattle cars and they ended at and lived in an area at the Chicago Stock Yards called "back of the yards."      
     The 1900 census of Chicago, Cook Co., IL finds him living at 5143 Winchester St with his wife Annie. This census gives his birth as Jun 1859 and the place as IL. The census report says that they had 10 children, 8 still living and they had been married 20 years. The census says, his father was born in NY and mother in Ohio. His occupation was R. R. Switchman and he owned his home with a mortgage.      
     After the death of his wife Anna, Frank married the house keeper, Mrs Ferguson, who had a son LeRoy. According to grandson Hugh, LeRoy Ferguson became the Archbishop of the Episcopalian Church in St. Paul, MN and Hugh believes that LeRoy collected and wrote information on the Hotchkin Family. Like much information carried down in a family, some of the above is correct, some is erroneous and some cannot be verified. The compiler has no information on LeRoy, but he was likely born in Chicago.
     Frank's grandson, Raymond Harry says that Frank's proper name was Frank Edward but he was often called Edward Frank. The records show that he was Ernest Frank by birth, but was called Frank Ernest. Raymond gives the first name of Frank's second wife, Matilda or Mathilda. Raymond Harry Hotchkin says relatives lived in the state of Minnesota near Ely. He also says that an Uncle of John Francis (brother of Frank Edward?) was an Episcopalian Minister in the Northwest and visited them occasionally. The compiler thinks that this is likely LeRoy Ferguson, son of Frank's second wife. There is no verification on any of this information.
     Ernest first appears in the Chicago City Directories in 1895, as a railroad switchman residing at 5141 Winchester. In 1896 the family lives at 345 Leeland and in 1898 they are back at the Winchester address. They appear at this address through 1910. The 1910 directory is the last directory available until 1928. The 1928 Polk Directory says that he is a carpenter and contractor and lives at 5828 S. Artesian, which is also the address of Hugh J., John F. and William M. Hotchkin. A microfilm of some voting records of 1892, has him at 5141 Winchester, Dist. 1, Ward 30, Precinct 34. The records show that he had lived in the precinct 2 months, the county 4 years and the state 4 years. This information likely places the families move from SD to IL in 1888. The death certificate for Frank, calls him Frank E. Hotchkin, born 1 Jun 1859, in El Paso, IL. It says that his father was Eber Hotchkin, and mother unknown. The certificate says that he worked 35 years for R. R. Donally Co. as a carpenter, and last worked in Aug 1936. His father's birthplace is given as Sullivan, NY.
Last Edited=5 Apr 2017

Children of Earnest Frank Hotchkin and Anna (Annie) Mueller

Child of Earnest Frank Hotchkin and Matilda Frichow Firhon

Citations

  1. [S273] Celia Bayne Hotchkin Civil War Pension Claim #79216, His mother's Ciliv War Pension claim for his father Eber gives his birth.
  2. [S274] Illinois Death Index, Chicago, Cook Co 1916 to 1950, The index gives his birth date.
  3. [S630] Illinois Marriages 1763 - 1930.
  4. [S274] Illinois Death Index, Chicago, Cook Co 1916 to 1950, File # 6032286, Frank E. Hotchkin, record filed 11/11/1936.
  5. [S647] Cook Co., IL Deaths.

Earnest Henry Hotchkin1

M, (12 January 1906 - 2 February 1975)
     Earnest Henry Hotchkin was born on 12 January 1906 at CT, USA.2,3 He was the son of Walter Raymond Hotchkin and Minnie Bushey. Earnest Henry Hotchkin appeared on the census of 1920 at Torrington, Litchfield County, CT, USA. The census lists the family as: Hotchkins, Ernest, 14, b CT; living with grandfather Michael Bushey.. Heserved during the World War II. He enlsted on 23 September 1943 while living at Hartford, Hartford County, CT, USA. His enlistment notes said: " Ernest H. Hotchkins, born 1906, native of Connecticut, no branch indicated, Private, enlisted for duration, grammer school, vocational counselor, single, no dependents, height 00, weight 00.". He died on 2 February 1975 at Torrington, Litchfield County, CT, at age 69.4,3 He was buried at Hillside Cemetery, at Torrington, Litchfield County, CT, USA.

     His listing in the Connecticut Death Index 1949 - 2001 calls hin Ernest Hotchkins, died 02 Feb 1975 at age of 69 years in Torrington, CT and never married. It looks as if Ernest used the spelling Hotchkins all of his life.
Social Security Death Index list him as Ernest Henry Hotchkins.
Last Edited=15 Jul 2017

Citations

  1. [S377] Connecticut World War II Veterans.
  2. [S218] Social Security Death Index 1935- 2014, SS #048-07-2235.
  3. [S1293] Social Security Applications and Claims 1936 to 2007.
  4. [S376] Death Certificate, File # 79368 1975.

Ebenezer Hotchkin DD1,2

M, (5 July 1869 - 6 November 1956)
Rev. Ebenezer Hotchkin, DD
     Ebenezer Hotchkin DD was born on 5 July 1869 at Livingland, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, USA.3,4,5 He was the son of Henry W. Hotchkin and Mary Jane Semple. He married Maria Emaline Moore at Wynnewood, Chickasaw Nation, Indian Territory, USA, on 13 July 1893. This marriage date comes from her obituary.. Ebenezer Hotchkin DD appeared on the census of 1910 at Durant, Bryan County, OK, USA. The census lists the family as: Ebenezer Hotchkin, age 40; b OK, father b OK, mother b OH; Maria, age 36, m1, 15 years, 7 children, 5 living, b MO, father b KY, mother b MO; Earl, son, age 13, b OK; Tommie, son age 10, b OK; Christine M., dau, age 4, b OK; Mary L., dau, age 3, b OK, Infant, dau, age 1/2 of 1/12, b OK.
     The next page of the census has the following, as if they are a continuation of Ebenezer's family, but as the father is listed as born in AL, this unlikely: Velma Hartley, dau, age 4, b OK, father b AL, mother b MA; Ruby May Hartley, dau, age 1 1/2, b OK, father b AL, mother b MA; Lucy Hartley, mother, age 63, wd, mother of 2 children, 2 living, b GA, parents b Carolina.. He was a Minister & Teacher circa 1920 at Durant, Bryan County, OK, USA. He resided at Sherman, Grayson County, TX, USA, in 1956. He died on 6 November 1956 at Sherman, Grayson County, TX, at age 87. According to funeral home records, he died at 2:45 pm. Services were held at the First Presbyterian Church of Durant, OK. His birth, death date and location is confirmed by funeral home records. Notice of his death is given in the November 8th edition of the Antler American in Antlers, OK..6 He was buried at Highland Cemetery, at Durant, Bryan County, OK, USA. Lot 33.

     Ebenezer received his early education from his mother and in the schools where she taught, but since these schools gave only elementary schooling, he was forced to attend other places for high school and college work. These were Park College near Kansas City, Fort Worth University and Austin College, Sherman, Texas, from which he received his DD. After leaving the government Indian School, Haskell Institute, at Lawrence, Kansas; he worked as a cowhand on the old Bar-Z ranch near Pauls Valley. In those days the cattle business was dangerous, for there were white and Indian rustlers and Negro outlaws. Many times the cowboys would have to fight these rustlers, and Ebenezer saw many of his associates shot. The cowboys have a code of ethics as to the use of obscene language around the camp house; anyone using such language was given 20 lashes with a wet rope. He once violated the code and was unable to ride his horse for a week. He gave up this rough life and finished his education at Park College, Missouri and Fort Worth University in Texas.
     Ebenezer said of himself, "I am about half Indian in heart and mind. I still associate with them almost as much as I mingle with my white neighbors. I know their weaknesses and their strengths, their problems and their desires, and am able to talk and advise with them when they bring their troubles to me, and many still do. Even the full bloods, who are becoming rarer as the civilization of the white encroaches on what I like to term the Indian civilization, count me as one of them."
     He, along with his mother, founded Oklahoma Presbyterian College in a small frame building on the main street of Durant, OK. This college grew to a recognized, accredited junior college with a plant valued at more than a quarter-million dollars. The depression placed a large financial burden on the school and in 1933 they were forced to merge its work with the State Teachers College. Lack of financial support finally caused the school to close its doors on 31 May 1966.
     Ebenezer's family favorite vacation place was Tin Cup, Gunnison Co., CO and they owned property there starting in 1941 when a County Treasurers Deed was Granted to Ebenezer on 10 September 1941 for Lots 13 to 24 of Tin Cup, Book 274, pg 329. At the date of this transfer, Ebenezer's address was Bennington, OK. Ebenezer then sold these lots to Ed Nissen on 5 April 1946.
     The Dalton-Holmes Funeral Home in Durant, OK furnished the Compiler records of Ebenezer's death and burial. These records confirm the established birth and death dates and locations. His funeral was conducted by four ministers; Revs Mueller, Craig, Helber, and McIntire. The records say that his physician was Dr Stanley Monroe. He is buried beside his wife Marie E. and his gravestone says Ebenezer Hotchkin July 5 1869--November 6 1956. The 1906 Durant City Directory shows Ebenezer Jr. living at 606 North 9th Ave.1,6,7,8
Last Edited=29 Aug 2010

Children of Ebenezer Hotchkin DD and Maria Emaline Moore

Citations

  1. [S155] Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol 24, pg 445.
  2. [S155] Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol 32, pg 80.
  3. [S517] Rex F. Harlow, Makers of Government in Oklahoma, pg 42, has an abriviated biography on Ebenezer and his family.
  4. [S19] Rev. E. C. Scott DD, Ministerial Directory of the Presbyterian Church, USA 1861- 1942, pg 315.
  5. [S518] Lyle H. Boren, Who's is Who in Oklahoma, pg 232.
  6. [S515] Dalton-Homes Funeral Home.
  7. [S63] Bryan County Heritage Association, History of Bryan County, Oklahoma, pg 317.
  8. [S503] Oklahoma Presbyterian College, February 1989, pg 42.

Ebenezer J. Hotchkin Rev.1,2,3

M, (20 March 1803 - 26 October 1867)
Rev. Ebenezer Hotchkin Sr., picture found at the Goodland School
     Ebenezer J. Hotchkin Rev. was born on 20 March 1803 at Richmond, Berkshire County, MA, USA.4,5,6 He was the son of Ebenezer Hodgkin Dea. and Ruth Hubbard. He married Philena Thatcher at Goshen, Choctaw Nation, MS, USA, on 2 November 1830.7,8 Ebenezer J. Hotchkin Rev. was employed circa 1850 at Goodwater, Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, USA, as a Minister. He appeared on the census of 1860 at Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, USA. The census lists the family as: Hotchkin, Ebenezer, 57 (1802), MA, Presbyterian minister; Philena F., 56 (1803), MA; Henry W., 23 (1836), Choc Nation, farmer; Charles E., 14 (1845), Choc Nation; Ann I., 28, MA, seamstress.. He died on 26 October 1867 at Lenox, Berkshire County, MA, USA, at age 64.9 He was buried at Church on the Hill Cemetery, at Lenox, Berkshire County, MA, USA.

     The Chronicles of Oklahoma, says that, "Ebenezer Hotchkin was a native of Richmond, MA. He received a good common school education in his native state, but never enjoyed the benefit of a college or seminary education. He received an appointment as a teacher from the American Board, and went to the Choctaw Country of Mississippi in 1828. There, he married Miss Thatcher of Lucerne County, PA, who was one of the earliest recruits when Dr. Kingsbury opened Mahew station. He applied to the Presbytery of Tombigbee for licensure to preach under what is known as the extraordinary clause in 1830, and after completing the requirements of Presbytery, was duly licensed at Columbus, MS, in 1832. He removed with the Choctaws in 1832 to Indian Territory, which is now Oklahoma." This trip is often called, The Trail of Tears. The Compiler has a copy of a letter, dated Goodwater, 10 August 1843 where he reports to a Major William Armstrong, Acting Superintendent of the Choctaw Schools, and describes his performances and budget for the period. The History of American Missions to the Heathen, published by Spooner and Howland gives the movement of Ebenezer: Born in Richmond in 1803, arrived Goshen, MS on 15 November 1828, Clear Creek January 1833, and Goodwater, OK in 1837.
     The Indians had Negro slaves and the southern missionaries, sometimes reluctantly, supported slavery. It was said that they did not know how the kitchens or laundries would operate without these slaves. This slavery problem caused the great break in the Presbytery and the result was the split of the Church Mission operation into northern and southern bodies. A group of letters, dated around 1856, is in the American Board of Foreign Missions files regarding slavery and a trip that George W. Wood took to Goodwater in an attempt to resolve the problem regarding the boards stand against slavery. A letter dated 15 April 1856, signed by Kingsbury, Byington, Hotchkin and Stark notifies the board that unless they withdraw all past legislation regarding slavery, the Goodwater group will resign effective 31 December 1856. "At the start of the Civil War, many Indians left their homes and fled into Kansas. The larger number of these were Creeks and Cherokees but there were some from every tribe. They were a destitute, pitiful sight, homeless and penniless, where a short time before they had been living in good homes. In the midst of these trying times, some Missionaries forsook them." The American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions, an organization of the Presbyterian and Congregational Churches, which had engaged in Missionary work in the Indian Territory since 1817, withdrew all support from their missionaries due to their opposition to slavery. Most of the Missionaries under the Board were active abolitionists. When the Civil War started, many fled the country; but a few such as Dr. Elizur Butler, Dr. Cyrus Kingsbury, Cyrus Byington, Ebenezer Hotchkin, Ebenezer's fatherinlaw Charles C. Copeland and O. P. Stark remained. The leadership of these missionaries was taken over by the Southern Presbyterian Church.
     A History of the State of Oklahoma, by Luther B. Hill, says that Ebenezer spoke the Choctaw language and often preferred Choctaw to English. The Daily Oklahoman, 13 Aug 1981 published a picture of the gristmill built by Ebenezer and the Indians on Clear Creek in 1820's. Ebenezer operated a Choctaw school at this site from 1836 to 1842. According to a newspaper article, it is believed that this is where the song Swing Low Sweet Chariot was composed. Rev. Ebenezer is buried back near where he was born, in the cemetery of the Little Church on the Hill, in front of the grave of his brother Rev. John Hotchkin. Ebenezer's head stone had been knocked over and the Compiler and his wife Cathy had to straighten it to find his grave. The stone has an inscription to his memory, "Forty-one years he labored as a zealous missionary to the Choctaw Indians." Presbyterian Missions of the Southern United States
     
, by E. T. Thompson, 1934, has several paragraphs regarding the family’s trip from Mississippi to Indian Territory. The material on the Hotchkin's and the Trail of Tears is taken from two pages under the title, A Trail of Tears. "Choctaw's were as loath to give up their homes as the Cherokees, but they saw the folly of resisting the white man and moved peacefully to Oklahoma between 1830 and 1848. Fifteen hundred to two thousand of the tribe died on the journey or shortly after reaching their new homes, from exposure, fatigue or cholera. Many of the most faithful of the older missionaries could not be retained; some of them remained in Mississippi, while others sadly made their way back to the East. The only missionary who actually accompanied the Choctaws on the Trail of Tears was Ebenezer Hotchkin. Mother Hotchkin. as she was called, rode a little Indian pony and carried her child on her lap from Natchez to Doaksville." When they arrived, writes one of their descendants, "There was nothing but the Wilderness. . . flour hauled from Little Rock cost $50 a barrel and all the meal must be ground on a little hand mill; pumpkin was the staff of life." Ebenezer Jr. says in a letter to the Presbyterian Historical Society, dated 5 September 1950 that some material on his grand parents is romantic and should not be believed. He quotes Dr. Kingsbury's diary that Hannah Maria was born on Clear Creek and not in MS, but Grant Foreman, The Five Civilized Tribes, clearly says that Hannah Mariah was a baby in arms on the great trip to Indian Territory. The Kingsbury's Diary mistake could have been caused by the fact that Rev. Kingsbury did not arrive in Indian Territory until 1835. Foreman's book is probably the best and most detailed on the Trail of Tears trip. He says that Mr. Williams of the Presbyterian Missionaries arrived first in the Choctaw country, on 12 July 1832, ten miles west of the Arkansas line, on Mountain Fork, a stream called Nonih Hacha by the Indians. Alfred Wright arrived at this location on 14 September 1832 after he had recovered from his heart attack in Little Rock, AR. In December 1832, Mr. Wright left the William's home and moved west to a place ten miles from Fort Towson, centrally located between the Mountain Fork and Kiamichi rivers, which he named Wheelock, and where he organized the church of Wheelock. Mr. Wright says "it was the next year, the year of the devastating fever, that the little log house had to accommodate also the family of Rev. Ebenezer Hotchkin, during the period of six months that they were helpless. They arrived in the west, the early part of the proceeding winter and were received in the home of Mr. Williams after Mr. and Mrs. Wright had left." This would make the Hotchkin's arrival in Choctaw country, late 1832.
     According to an obituary written in the Missionary Herald, Vol 63, No 12, p 404; Ebenezer was known by the Choctaw name of Lapish Hanta (Peace Trumpet), and "thousands of Choctaw's have heard him sound the gospel's trumpet."
     The 1860 census of Choctaw Nation, Indian Territory, later to be Oklahoma, finds him in Doaksville, living with his wife, two sons and a daughter. An 1885 Census labeled "1885 Choctaw Freedmen- Doubtful Claims", has a listing as follows with no explanation: The publication says that the original document is at the National Archives in Record Group 75. Reuben Hotchkin/E. Hotchkin, Missionary (Unamed) Cherokee Womans's Children by Hotchkin-- Silas Hotchkin, James Hotchkin, Sallie Hotchkin, William Hotchkin, Robert Hotchkin, Seah Hotchkin, Lottie Hotchkin, Joe Murray.
     The Goodland Acadamy of Hugo has a website with this opening statement. "In 1835, Ebenezer Hotchkins and Cyrus Kingsbury, Presbyterian ministers, established the Yakni Achukma Mission station. In 1838, William Fields, a full-blood Choctaw, built the first home on the Goodland campus. As the community grew, the most vital concern of the Choctaw people was the education of their children. In 1848, the first full-time minister took up residency on the grounds of present day Good Land (Yakni Achukma). John Lathrop and his wife built the first manse and ministered for two years to the Choctaws. As they returned home in 1850, the Rev. Oliver Porter Stark and his wife were assigned to Good Land. His wife began the next day teaching any Choctaw children that would come to their two room log manse. Orphaned children were boarded by families on present day Goodland property, so they could receive an education. Within two years, the number had grown to 42 children. This was the humble beginnings of the boarding school. The Church building served for 42 years as both school and church for the area. Renovated several times since being built in 1852, the same church -- restored and enlarged -- stands on the Goodland campus today. It serves as a constant reminder of God's faithfulness to each successive generation."
A short article in 1852 shows Ebenezer and two other Hotchkin's returning to Indian Territory from Lenox. He must have been home for a visit.10,11,1,12,13,14,15,16
Last Edited=1 Sep 2017

Children of Ebenezer J. Hotchkin Rev. and Philena Thatcher

Citations

  1. [S81] Ernest Trice Thompson, Presbyterian Missions in the Southern United States.
  2. [S133] Grant Foreman, The Five Civilized Tribes, pg 41. Ebenezer describes the enormous poor condition of the native indian population.
  3. [S155] Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol 4, pg 176.
  4. [S199] W. B. Morrison, Diary of Rev Cyrus Kingsbury, gives a date of 19 March 1803.
  5. [S155] Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol 10, pg 225.
  6. [S155] Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol 6, pg 361.
  7. [S73] Joseph W. Wilson, Presbyterian Historical Almanac, 1868, pg 335.
  8. [S404] LDS Film#1, 260, 799 #8, 032, 602.
  9. [S73] Joseph W. Wilson, Presbyterian Historical Almanac, 1868, pg 334-335.
  10. [S155] Chronicles of Oklahoma, vol IV, 1926.
  11. [S43] A B Luther B. Hill, History of the State of Oklahoma.
  12. [S133] Grant Foreman, The Five Civilized Tribes.
  13. [S199] W. B. Morrison, Diary of Rev Cyrus Kingsbury.
  14. [S551] Sidney Henry Babcock & John Y. Bryce, History of Methodism in Oklahoma.
  15. [S552] William Brown Morrison, Military Posts and Camps in Oklahoma.
  16. [S806] Return of Rev Ebenezer Hotchkin to Indian Territory, The Recorder.

Eber Hall Hotchkin Segt.

M, (1833 - 20 February 1865)
     Eber Hall Hotchkin Segt. was born in 1833 at Liberty, Sullivan County, NY, USA. He was the son of Zebulon Hotchkin and Elizabeth Ann Hall. He married Celia Ann Bayne at El Paso, Woodford County, IL, USA, on 3 November 1857.1 Eber Hall Hotchkin Segt. was a Segt, andserved in Co A, 86th IL Infantry, during the Civil War. He died as a prisoner. Mustered in on 27 August 1862. Pension file.

Joined AUG 6, 1862 at EL PASO, IL
Joined CAPT MAGARITY for a period 3 YRS
Muster In AUG 27, 1862 In PEORIA, IL

When Magarity had about 100 volunteers, he took his company across the Illinois River to Peoria, Illinois where they went into camp at Camp Lyon, near present day Glen Oak Park. On August 27, 1862, 96 men of the Woodford County company were mustered into service as Co. A of the 86th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry. Magarity was elected Captain of Co. A. Eber Hotchkin was elected by the men of Co. A to serve as their 4th Corporal.
On September 7, 1862, the men of the 86th marched out of Camp Lyon through the streets of Peoria, with much fanfare, to the railroad station where they boarded trains bound for Camp Joe Holt, in Jeffersonville, Indiana, which was located on the Ohio River across from Louisville. After several weeks of drilling, the men of the 86th were assigned to a Brigade being commanded by General Daniel McCook and they were sent into Kentucky in pursuit of the last Confederate troops in Kentucky.
On Oct. 8, 1862, McCook's Brigade caught up with those Confederate troops and were briefly engaged withe them in the Battle of Perryville, Kentucky, the 86th suffering their first casualties. There would be many more in the coming years. After the Battle of Perryville, the Confederates withdrew from the State of Kentucky and the men of McCook's Briagde marched on to Nashville, Tennessee, where they would spend the winter of 1862/63.
During the next 2 years, Eber Hotchkin would serve faithfully in Co. A. During this time he was also promoted to the rank of Sergeant as a sign of his military bearing and his dedication to the service and to the men of Co. A. During this time he was also a witness and a participant in some of the bloodiest fighting of the Western Theatre of the war, including the Battles of Chickamauga, Georgia; Resaca, Georgia; Rome, Georgia; Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia, Jonesboro, Georgia; and also participated on General Sherman's Infamous "March to the Sea."
In 1866, J. R. Kinnear, a member of the 86th Illinois, with the help of several other members and officers of the 86th wrote one of the earliest Regimental histories. An incident occured on November 30, 1864, during the infamous "March to the Sea" that he wrote the following about in his HISTORY OF THE 86TH. "However, about noon on the 28th, the command having left Sandersville, arrived on the west bank of Rocky Comfort creek. The bridge over this stream being burnt, it was obliged to wait till late in the evening before a crossing could be effected into Louisville, where it went into camp one mile east of the town. At this camp, on the evening of the 29th, Colonel Fahnestock took his regiment on picket, and on the next day fought a force of the enemy's cavalry which was making a demonstration on our lines in several places, keeping the pickets on the maneuver most of the day. At the first alarm of the enemy on the lines of the Eighty-sixth, the Colonel ordered his men to advance to a line two hundred yards to his front and throw up a line of barricades for protection. While this was being done a constant fire was kept up on the rebels, whose course was soon turned, being compelled to withdraw in confusion across a large cornfield. When they reached the farther side of this field they formed their lines, and also threw up a line of barricades which they held until late in the afternoon, when the regiment charged them away and took possession, and following them up for more than a mile, returned. Though the casualties of the regiment in this day's skirmish were not great, the excitement, nevertheless, ran high. Its loss was four missing or captured. The company loss was as follows: Co. A, two; Co. F, one ; Co. K, one. The foragers from our division on this occasion were made to suffer severely. The enemy came upon them so suddenly that they were unable to get back to the lines; not a few of them were killed and captured, and many of them, being overbalanced with wines, were shot in cold blood."
The four men from the 86th who were captured on November 30, 1864 at Louisville, Georgia were Private Charles Wiley, of Co. K, Private Alfred Reeder, of Co. F, and Private Robert Chittick and Sergeant Eber Hotchkin, both of Co. A. Sergeant Hotchkin may have initially been sent to the infamous Andersonville Prison in Andersonville, Georgia. The other three were most likely "guests" there as well. That Stockade was opened in September, 1864 and continued in operation until February 1865. During this time between 15,000 and 18,000 Union soldiers were imprisoned on less than 24 acres. It is estimated that between 2,500 and 2,800 prisoners died in captivity during the five months the prison was operational. After the capture of Atlanta, Georgia by Union forces, Confederate authorities decided to transfer the majority of Union prisoners from Andersonville, Georgia. Due to its proximity to major rail lines, Florence was chosen as the site for a new prison camp. In this book, Rev. Ledoux, a board member of the Friends of the Florence Stockade (FFS), documents over 1,500 Union soldiers who died in the Florence Stockade. The majority of the original records of the Florence Stockade did not survive the War Between the States, thus documenting those who died there proved to be challenging.
Sergeant Eber Hotchkin is known to have died of starvation on February 20, 1865 as a Prisoner of War in the Confederate Stockade at Florence, South Carolina. This information is recorded in Celia Ann (Bayne) Hotchkin's Pension Certificate #79216, where she asks for a pension for herself and their son Ernest F. Hotchkin. The earthly remains pf Sergeant Eber Hall Hotchkin were buried in a mass burial trench outside the prison walls. He died on 20 February 1865 at Florence, Florence County, SC, USA. According to his Pension file, he died of starvation in a prisioner of war camp at Florence, SC..2 He was buried at Florence National Cemetery, at Florence, Florence County, SC, USA. Corporal EBER HALL HOTCHKIN, Co. A, 86th Illinois

Eber Hall Hotchkin was born in 1833 in Liberty, Sullivan County, New York.

Eber was married to Celia Ann Bayne on November 3, 1857.

The Stockade was opened in September, 1864 and continued in operation until February 1865. During this time between 15,000 and 18,000 Union soldiers were imprisoned on less than 24 acres. It is estimated that between 2,500 and 2,800 prisoners died in captivity during the five months the prison was operational. After the capture of Atlanta, Georgia by Union forces, Confederate authorities decided to transfer the majority of Union prisoners from Andersonville, Georgia. Due to its proximity to major rail lines, Florence was chosen as the site for a new prison camp. In this book, Rev. Ledoux, a board member of the Friends of the Florence Stockade (FFS), documents over 1,500 Union soldiers who died in the Florence Stockade. The majority of the original records of the Florence Stockade did not survive the War Between the States, thus documenting those who died there proved to be challenging.

Eber died on February 20, 1865 as a Prisoner of War in the Confederate Stockade at Florence, South Carolina. His earthly remains were buried in the mass burial trench outside the prison walls. Today his earthly remains lie buried in this unmarked grave..

     Eber Hall Hotchkin, the oldest son of Zebulon, left home as a young man and wandered across the states of Ohio and Indiana and ended up in El Paso, IL; where he meet and married Celia Bayne, the daughter of an early pioneer of the area. Eber enlisted in the Union Army on 6 August 1862 and joined Co. A, 86th Regt of the Illinois Volunteers as a Sergeant. According to the records he died of stravation, in a Rebel prison camp at Florence, SC on 20 February 1865. This information is recorded in his wife's Pension Certificate #79216, where she asks for a pension for herself and their son Ernest F. Hotchkin, who she says was born on 1 June 1859 in El Paso. One of the documents in the file refers to a death date for Eber of 3 or 4 March 1865. Caroline Bayne, relationship to Celia not given, says in a sworn statement that Eber and Celia had no other children. Some of the Civil War records refer to Eber as Eben.
Last Edited=27 Nov 2015

Children of Eber Hall Hotchkin Segt. and Celia Ann Bayne

Citations

  1. [S630] Illinois Marriages 1763 - 1930.
  2. [S253] Eber Hall Hotchkin Civil War Pension Application 79216.

Edgar Elwyn Hotchkin

M
Edgar Hotchkin, taken on a 1987 cruise
     Edgar Elwyn Hotchkin is the son of Franklin Elwyn Hotchkin and Margaret Josephine Smith. He married Sarah Catherine (Cathy) Edwards at Lansing, Ingham County, MI, USA, on 11 July 1947.1 Edgar Elwyn Hotchkin married Evangeline Puring Domasin, daughter of Peter Lorisca Domasin and Evelyn Olivia Bain, on 29 October 2011 at Annandale Golf Club, Pasadena, Los Angeles County, CA, USA.2
Last Edited=5 Apr 2017

Family: Edgar Elwyn Hotchkin and Evangeline Puring Domasin

Citations

  1. [S411] Main Street Methodist Church, Married by Rev H. Schwarzkoph, Asst Minister, Main Street Methodist Church. Witnessed by Jerrold L. Hotchkin and Grace Stoner (Jerry's first wife).
  2. [S1230] Edgar Elwyn Hotchkin, Evangeline Domasin Binninger.

Edith Hotchkin

F, (circa 1825 - March 1876)
     Edith Hotchkin was born circa 1825. This birth date is really a wild guess. Edith died in March 1876 at Meadville, Crawford County, PA, USA. She was buried on 8 March 1876 at Greendale Cemetery, at Meadville, Crawford County, PA, USA. Compiler could not read all of the information but it said Stayers Grove and something else unreadable..
Last Edited=27 Jan 2007

Edith Amy Hotchkin

F, (11 June 1894 - 12 November 1907)
Edith Amy Hotchkin
     Edith Amy Hotchkin was born on 11 June 1894 at Benton Harbor, Berrien County, MI, USA. 1900 census says birth June 1893.1 She was the daughter of Franklin Evi Hotchkin and Mary Winona (Minnie) Hendrick. Edith Amy Hotchkin died on 12 November 1907 at Grand Ledge, Eaton County, MI, USA, at age 13.1 She was buried at Oakwood Cemetery, at Grand Ledge, Eaton County, MI, USA.

     Edith Amy was in poor health all her life and died within a few years after the family returned to Michigan from Nebraska.
Last Edited=10 May 2013

Citations

  1. [S1024] Edith Amy Hotchkin Death, Copy.

Edith Rozella Hotchkin

F, (10 October 1883 - 2 June 1942)
Compiler is not sure but this likely Edith Rozella Hotchkin Fritz as she was the 1st reunion Secretary and hence must have been there and everyone else is identified.
     Edith Rozella Hotchkin was born on 10 October 1883 at Spring Arbor, Jackson County, MI, USA. She was the daughter of Smith Curtis Hotchkin and Mary Elizabeth Crispell. She married Lavata August Fritz at Charlotte, Eaton County, MI, USA, on 14 February 1901.1,2 Edith Rozella Hotchkin died on 2 June 1942 at Concord, Jackson County, MI, USA, at age 58.3 She was buried at Maple Grove Cemetery, at Concord, Jackson County, MI, USA.

     Edith's birth is recorded in Jackson Co. Vital Records, page 55, #1883, under the name of Edith Rozella Hodgkiss of Spring Arbor. This record gives her parents as Mary E. Hodgkiss (wife of Smith Curtis Hotchkin) and Joseph B. Klinesmith of Spring Arbor. It is possible that this report is accurate and Edith is not the daughter of Smith Curtis. At the 1884 special census of Spring Arbor, Jackson Co., MI she is with her parents and her age is given as 0, born 1 October 1883. The 1900 census finds her living with her father and brother in Mills Twp., Midland Co., MI. Her age is given as 16, and born in MI, October 1883. According to their marriage license (pg 56, 1901 Jackson Co. Marriage Records), Larata and Edith Hotchkin were married on 14 February 1901 at Charlotte, by Hirim D. Allen, MG, with Theron and Alice Hotchkin serving as witnesses.
Last Edited=30 May 2010

Children of Edith Rozella Hotchkin and Lavata August Fritz

Citations

  1. [S48] Marjorie Hotchkin & Lila Wythe, Michigan Hotchkin Family Reunion Notes, Feb 14 1901.
  2. [S462] Michigan Marriage Records 1868 - 1925, Feb 14 1901.
  3. [S48] Marjorie Hotchkin & Lila Wythe, Michigan Hotchkin Family Reunion Notes, died at home of brother Theron.

Edna Teresa Hotchkin

F
     Edna Teresa Hotchkin is the daughter of Lee Thomas Hotchkin Sr. and Edna Louise Zuchelli. Edna Teresa Hotchkin married David Gayton circa 1995 at CA, USA.
Last Edited=20 Jan 2007

Family: Edna Teresa Hotchkin and David Gayton

Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin

M, (13 February 1889 - 17 September 1953)
     Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin was born on 13 February 1889 at Newton, Jasper County, IA, USA. He was the son of William Arthur Hotchkin and Mary Ellen Dowling. Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin appeared on the census of 1910 at Malaka Twp, Jasper County, IA, USA. The census lists the family as: Edward J. Hotchkin, 21, married 0/12, born IA, father born IL, mother born IA; wife Laura, 19, married 0/12 years, no children, born IA, father born IL, mother born IA. Living next door to Irene and son Ode.. He married Laura Marie Polhamus at Sacred Heart Church, Newton, Jasper County, IA, USA, on 4 April 1910. Married 0/12 at the 1910 census..1 Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin lived in 1915 at Detroit, Wayne County, MI, USA. Edward J. Hotchkin lived at 550 Penn Ave in Detroit and is listed as a Cond. whick likely means Conductor. He registered for the World War I Draft on 5 January 1917 while living at Detroit, Wayne County, MI. The registration card gave additional information on him: "He give his birth as 13 Feb 1889 in Newton , IA. He is a street car conductor in Detroit. He has a wife and 2 children age 3 and 6. Names are not given.". He married Rosa S. Mithelman at Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA, USA, on 15 March 1935.1 Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin died on 17 September 1953 at Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA, at age 64. He was buried at Hazelwood Cemetery, at Grinnell, Poweshiek County, IA, USA.
Last Edited=11 Apr 2017

Children of Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin and Laura Marie Polhamus

Family: Edward (Edwin) John Hotchkin and Rosa S. Mithelman

Citations

  1. [S1208] Iowa Marriages 1809- 1992.

Edward (Edwin) Seward Hotchkin1

M, (14 December 1873 - 22 September 1961)
     Edward was born at Akron, Summit County, OH, USA, on 14 December 1873. He gives this date at his draft registration..1 He was the son of Samuel Beriah Hotchkin and Louisa Cornelia Seward. Edward (Edwin) Seward Hotchkin registered for the World War I Draft in 1918 while living at Winfield, Cowley County, KS, USA. The registration card gave additional information on him: "He gives birth date as 4 Dec 1873 and says that he does clerical work for F. Collier and Sons in Kansas City, KS. He gives as a dependent his Mothe, Louisa Cornelia Hotchkin.". He appeared on the census of 1930 at Winfield, Cowley County, KS, USA. The census lists the family as: Edwin is called Edward S., age 56, iving with his brother Mac Leod at 406 Lomis St.. Edward died on 22 September 1961 at Wellington, Sumner County, KS, USA, at age 87. He was buried at Union Cemetery, at Winfield, Cowley County, KS, USA. East 1/2, Lot 39, Block 2.2

     He gives his name as Edwin Seward Hotchkin at his draft registration.
Last Edited=5 Apr 2017

Citations

  1. [S217] Civil War Pension Records of Samuel B. Hotchkin.
  2. [S163] , Compiler has viewed this gravestone.

Edward Augustine Hotchkin

M, (29 August 1855 - 9 April 1887)
     Edward Augustine Hotchkin was born on 29 August 1855 at Pulteney, Steuben County, NY, USA. He was the son of Beriah Hervey Hotchkin and Martha Bridge Prentiss. Edward Augustine Hotchkin died on 9 April 1887 at Pulteney, Steuben County, NY, at age 31. He was buried at Glenview Cemetery, at Pulteney, Steuben County, NY, USA.
Last Edited=8 Jul 2002

Edward Ernest Hotchkin1

M
     Edward Ernest Hotchkin is the son of Earl Edward Hotchkin and Rita Catherine Cypert. He married Ann Margaret Devery at Sullivan County, NY, USA, on 4 September 1976.
Last Edited=20 Jan 2007

Children of Edward Ernest Hotchkin and Ann Margaret Devery

Citations

  1. [S262] Earl E. Hotchkin, Compiler Edgar E Hotchkin.

Edward H. Hotchkin

M, (October 1881 - )
     Edward H. Hotchkin was born in October 1881 at OH, USA. He was the son of Alfred Melancthon Hotchkin and Charlotte M. Hotchkin.

     The 1900 census Of Meadville gives Edward's birth in OH and his parents birth in OH. It also clearly says that he is a son of Alfred and Charlotte who were both born in NY.
Last Edited=12 Dec 2013